2015 Laureates awarded for energy-saving method

Akira Isogai, Tsuguyuki Saito, Tokyo University and Yoshiharu Nishiyama, Cermav, France, were the first scientists from Japan to be awarded with the Marcus Wallenberg Prize. They were also the first laureates from Asia.

The Marcus Wallenberg Prize is based on appropriations of Stora Kopparbergs Bergslags AB, Sweden, to encourage scientific achievements of importance to forestry and forest industries. The Prize is awarded yearly. Harry Hutchinson Holton, Canada, was the first recipient in 1981. Canada has up to now received The Marcus Wallenberg Prize six times.

Sweden most successful

Sweden is with nine prizes the most successful award winning country so far. Finland has received eight prizes.

The Marcus Wallenberg Prize has been distributed to 56 laureates from ten countries during its 35 years of history.

In 2015 Akira Isogai, Tsuguyuki Saito, Tokyo University and Yoshiharu Nishiyama, Cermav, France, were awarded for their development of an energy saving method to produce nanofibrillated cellulose.

Eleven prizes have over the years been related to pulp and paper.

Just as many were related to forestry and five prizes to wood products.

Nomination online

More than 500 organizations or individuals contribute to the nomination process. Candidates can be nominated online via the nomination page.

The Foundation Board decides on prize winners, based on a recommendation from its Selection Committee. Professor Gunilla Jönson, Lund University, is the chairman of the committee.  At the moment, members of the committee represent scientific institutions or similar organizations in Sweden, Finland, Canada and the USA.